More Photos from our WWNP group trip to Montezuma NWR

To view the intial article and photographs, click here.

All of our ‘Wildlife Watchers and Nature Photographers’ [WWNP] group who went to the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge [NWR], near Seneca Falls, New York, are welcome to submit photographs for this gallery  (as in please do so!)

 Bald Eagle (immature), by Kathy Fenna. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Bald Eagle (immature), by Kathy Fenna. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagle (adult), by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Bald Eagle (adult), by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bald Eagle in flight, by Anrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Bald Eagle in flight, by Anrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Osprey at nest, by Kathy Fenna. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Osprey at nest, by Kathy Fenna. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Osprey by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Osprey by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Harrier (female) in flight, by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Northern Harrier (female) in flight, by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Song Sparrow, by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Song Sparrow, by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesser Yellowlegs, by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Lesser Yellowlegs, by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird (male), by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Red-winged Blackbird (male), by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird. Esther Kowal-Bukata. Copyright, 2014. All rights reserved.
Red-winged Blackbird. Esther Kowal-Bukata. Copyright, 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red-winged Blackbird. Esther Kowal-Bukata. Copyright, 2014. All rights reserved.
Red-winged Blackbird. Esther Kowal-Bukata. Copyright, 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

And last but not least, by Andrea Burke, Snow Geese in flight (1). Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
And last but not least, by Andrea Burke, Snow Geese in flight (1). Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Geese in flight (2), by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.
Snow Geese in flight (2), by Andrea Burke. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snow Geese. Esther Kowal-Bukata. Copyright, 2014. All rights reserved.
Snow Geese. Esther Kowal-Bukata. Copyright, 2014. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As requested above, if other members of the group have photographs they would like to include in this post we would be very pleased to add them.  Please re-size them to 600 pixels on the long side and e-mail them to me, as attachments, via:  wwnp[AT]eddiewren[DOT]com — simply replace the [AT] and the [DOT] with the correct symbols.

  • To go back to the original article and photographs, click here

Eddie

5 thoughts on “More Photos from our WWNP group trip to Montezuma NWR”

  1. Thanks for posting the photos Eddie. It was a great day. Can’t wait to see more photos from everyone.

    Love Kathy’s eagle! It looks like it was so close. All my shots are from so far away.

    Eddie- how can I tell if I have Tundra Swan or Trumpeter Swan photo?

    1. It’s a pleasure, Andrea, and I agree with you about Kathy’s shot of the immature ‘baldie’ — it’s great.

      As for tundra swans -vs- trumpeters, adult tundras have an all-black bill, sometimes with a little touch of dark pink under what one could inaccurately call their ‘chin’. Adult trumpeters, on the other hand, have a bit of yellow on the bill itself, right up by the eye.

      Interestingly (or confusingly perhaps), the tundra swan is split into two taxa, or groups. For those that follow this train of thought, the ‘version’ found in Eurasia is known as the Bewick’s swan and the American (i.e. tundra) version is correctly known as the ‘whistling swan’, so if ever you hear anyone talking about whistlers, they are referring to what we are calling tundras — yet another area where checking the scientific names can clear up a lot of confusion.

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